ITALIAN BABY PRODUCTS LEADERS RETURN WITH THE LATEST MODEL STROLLER FOR 2018, THE FOPPAPEDRETTI BIKINI

For over 70 years Foppapedretti has been synonymous with quality, function and safety – and this year sees the Italian-based company releasing their brand new stroller/car seat combo into the world of baby travel gear – the Foppapedretti Bikini.

With world-famous travel gear products such as the 3-Chic and the Piuleggero already in the SA market through Prima Baby, the Bikini answers the modern woman’s request for convenience, trend and quality, whilst still maintaining the compact combo-style approach to travel gear systems.

And the Bikini offers just that:
– Stroller seat/carry cot combo
– Chassis
– Car Seat
– Diaper Bag

Also included in this beautiful combo is a foot muff, storage basket, rain cover, reversible options for the seats and all the adjustability to keep baby at ultimate comfort levels.

ABOUT FOPPAPEDRETTI – A DELIGHTFUL STORY

Foppapedretti was formed 70 years ago by the Italian Ezio Foppa Pedretti – a young man with a fierce passion for wood.
It was 1945, and Ezio was spending all his time dedicating to crafting children’s toys from off-cuts of wood from his uncle’s factory. By 1946, the determined young carpenter had enrolled the help of his sister, brother and mother and started up the Foppapedretti Toy Factory.
The rest is history as the company grew from strength to strength, expanding to embrace other materials and aspects of a child’s development, yet they are still today one of the leading makers in authentic wooden toy products.

See more of their story at https://www.foppapedretti.it

The Bikini is available is a powerful grey and a funky green at http://www.takealot.com, http://www.loot.com, http://www.purplepepperz.com, http://www.sosobabies.co.za, http://www.thebabyzone.co.za, Hamleys stores and selected Kids Emporium stores.

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What to do with your baby scans

I remember the excitement I felt at each one of my first scans.

That first glimpse of your baby…their first photo.

I also remember how mostly these images were carelessly forgotten in a photo album.

With bear we had a scan every month and I have a beautiful collection of his growth both on DVD and in a special handmade album.

I also remember wanting to try include papa in this specialness and Nelia from www.givethanks.co.za made him this very special card from Hamish.

But what do you honestly do with all those scan images other than keep them in an album?

I’ve rounded up a list of custom items that can be made to display your babys beautiful scan photos.

Most of these items can be ordered from your local printer.

The keyring can be made by editing a scan image on the computer to make it smaller and printing it. You can purchase keyrings that allow you to slip a image in from a craft shop.

This would make a special thank you gift at the baby shower. I used a photo of bears scan as Thank you cards for my baby shower guests.

The decoupage heart can also be made by using modge podge to paint over a scan photo onto a heart blank. I love this idea to use on a Christmas tree or as a special ornament for grandparents.

The jewellery is stunning and there are many online traders. Just some advise I ordered several photo jewellery sets and the supplier did not look at the jewellery quality so I ended up with a necklace with missing gems.

Ask what the return policy is and always inspect your jewellery for flaws immediately after receiving it.

Single father’s in South Africa

My eldest son is currently in a situation where he finds himself about to become a first time father at 23.

Whilst I’m certainly not ready to become a Glam-ma, I owe it to my son to guide and support him.

How do you support an unplanned pregnancy.

Carefully …

In this case the young girl is 18 and just finished school. As a teen mom myself I know all too well the challenges that she will face along the way.

As a mom who raised her children alone and divorced I’m also aware of the delicate situation this poor baby is being born into and the amount of maturity, co-parenting and support both future mom and dad will need.

Whilst there is not much that you can do to change a situation other than accept it and weather the new territory one step at a time you can do the following:

  • You can refrain from voicing too strong an opinion. This decision is between the mom and dad . It is more difficult to guide than to discipline but the parents will need to work together for the sake of their child.
  • You can offer your advise and discuss all options available to both parents. Alternatively You could contact www.famsa.org and arrange counselling or mediation for the new parents.
  • You can accept that you play a role in guiding your child into a daunting new chapter of their lives and offer the support they need regardless of how you feel towards the other parent.
  • You can prepare your family for the arrival of a brand new member to love and enjoy. Encouraging both parents to equally be involved in this journey.

It is often easier for a man to put out of his mind the pregnancy , especially if he is not living with the babies mother. He should be encouraged to prepare for baby, plan, discuss his thoughts, read up about pregnancy, support the mother emotionally and attend Dr and antenatal visits.

You could start a scan album for the dad to be to keep his first photos in , throw him a nappy braai, buy him some baby books to read and ask often how he is feeling as you assist with baby shopping .

What are single dad’s rights in South Africa?

According to the South Africa’s Children’s Act a child born out of wedlock is a child whose natural parents were not married to each other at the time of such child’s conception or at any time thereafter.

The Act No. 86, 1997 (NATURAL FATHERS OF CHILDREN BORN OUT OF WEDLOCK ACT. 1997) states:

  • A court may on application by the natural father of a child born out of wedlock make an order granting the natural father access rights to or custody or guardianship of the child on the conditions determined by the court. An application will be granted should the court be satisfied that it’s in the best interest of the child.

Section 19 of the Children’s Act 38 of 2005 states:

  • A mother, whether married or unmarried, has full rights and responsibilities towards her child, but a married father also has full rights and responsibilities.
  • An unmarried biological father will only have automatic parental rights if he is living with the mother in a permanent life partnership (and consents to being identified as the father).
  • Fathers who are in a cohabitation relationship with the mother to have an inherent right to contact, care and guardianship.

Therefore the biological father does not have any automatic parental rights unless he was in a relationship with the mother. He has the option to apply under section 2(1) of the Natural Fathers Born Out of Wedlock Act 86 of 1987 for access rights to or custody or guardianship of the child.

Important information for single fathers

  • Does the biological unmarried father have to pay maintenance:

Yes it is his duty to maintain his child

  • Does an unmarried father need to be considered for important decisions:

Yes – when it comes to:

    • Passport application for the child
    • Adoption of the child by another person
    • Removal of the child from South Africa
    • If the child wants to get married

Up until the Children’s Act was enforced, the law favoured the mother as the parent who would be given the care and custody of minor children. That situation has since been drastically changed. The court is now required by law to look at what is in the best interests of the child, rather than look at favouring a mother or father as the custodial parent.

Most importantly it is never easy being a first time parent and your son will need your wisdom, support and love as he prepares for a new life.

Listerosis … source found

The Department of Health and Safety issued a press release today announcing the source of the deadly Listeriosis virus.

You can read more about the disease here.https://funmammasa.wordpress.com/2018/01/28/listeriosis-what-you-need-to-know/

It was revealed that the source of Listeriosis is from the Enterprise company and many meats are in fact contaminated and being recalled.

This report by http://www.new24.com highlights the facts we as consumers need to know.

https://m.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/enterprise-foods-to-recall-affected-products-but-conducting-own-listeriosis-tests-20180304

www.woolworths.co.za issued the following statement on their Facebook page:

” Food safety is of paramount importance to Woolworths and we take all issues regarding the production of our food seriously.

Woolworths has a team of food scientists and technologists who proactively manage food safety, in addition to our independent food safety testing and auditing, to prevent microbial contamination of food. This testing includes Listeria.

Following the recent announcement by the Department of Health on the source of the Listeriosis outbreak, and as an additional precautionary measure, we are recalling a limited number of viennas and cold meats.

Customers who have any of the listed products, should return the products to their local store for a full refund

A list of recalled lunch meat, sausages and other products was listed for recall.

Mammas I for one won’t be rushing out to buy any processes meat anytime soon.

Tree of life App

Have you ever heard of a “brelfie”?

WHAT IS A “BRELFIE”?

A BRELFIE is a selfie chosen to make breastfeeding even more beautiful than what it already is.

How does it work ?

The app allows you to add a magical Tree of Life to their pictures, and the effect is nothing short of stunning.

You can either download pictures from the internet or use the app’s Tree of Life sticker pack.

You can also add other magical effects.

How to use the App

Moms have been sharing their BRELFIES on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter with the hashtags.

#TreeOfLife

#brelfie

Why share this ?

Moms are sharing not only to highlight the beauty of breastfeeding but also to reduce the outdated stigma of breastfeeding in public.

Tips to Help Prevent Stretch Marks

Stretch marks look like indented streaks in your skin and can appear red, purple, or silver in appearance.

Stretch marks most often appear on the:

● stomach

●chest

●hips

●bottom

●thighs

Stretch marks are common in pregnancy, but anyone can develop stretch marks at any phase of life.

Even if you’re at increased risk of stretch marks, there are some things you can do to reduce your risk and treat the stretch marks you already have.

How to reduce and treat stretch marks

1.Control your weight…

One of the most helpful things you can do to prevent stretch marks,whether you’re pregnant or not, is to maintain a healthy weight. Stretch marks occur when your skin pulls apart quickly due to rapid weight or loss.

Some people develop stretch marks during growth spurts, such as during puberty.

2. Stay Hydrated…

Drinking enough water may help keep your skin hydrated and soft. Soft skin doesn’t’t tend to develop stretch marks as much as dry skin does.

3.Eat a nutrient-rich Diet…

Stretch marks can also occur if you lack nutrition in certain areas. Eating foods that boost skin health may help.

Your diet needs to include foods rich in:

●vitamin C

●vitamin D

●vitamin E

●zinc

●protein

One way to make sure you’re getting a variety of nutrients is to choose unprocessed foods in various colors.

4.Include Vitamin c in your Diet…

Collagen plays a large role in keeping your skin strong and elastic. It helps reduce the appearance of wrinkles, and it is important for preventing stretch marks.

Vitamin C is an important nutrient for the development of collagen and can be found in many fruits and vegetables.

5.Soak up some Vitamin D…

Results suggest that maintaining healthy levels of vitamin D may reduce your risk of stretch marks.The easiest way to get vitamin D is through exposure to the sun.

6.Eat Food Rich in zinc…

Zinc is an important nutrient for skin health. It helps to reduce inflammation and plays an important role in the wound healing process.

7.Treat Fresh Stretch Mark when the appear…

If you can’t totally prevent stretch marks on your skin, you can work to minimize their appearance so they are not as noticeable.

RISK FACTORS

Some people are more likely to develop stretch marks.

Risk factors include:

  • being female
  • having a family history of stretch marks
  • being overweight
  • being pregnant
  • gaining or losing weight quickly
  • using corticosteroids
  • having breast augmentation
  • having certain genetic disorders

STRETCH MARK IN PREGNANCY

Pregnancy is one of the most common times when women notice stretch marks. In fact, it’s estimated that 50 to 90 percent of pregnant women will develop stretch marks before delivery.

Some experts believe that hormones during pregnancy may make you more prone to stretch marks. The hormones may bring more water into the skin,relaxing it and making it easier to tear when stretched.

The best way for pregnant women to prevent stretch marks is to gain pregnancy weight slowly.

If you do develop stretch marks during pregnancy, you may be glad to know that they will eventually fade.

TREATMENT

Preventing stretch marks may be difficult, but there are many treatments that may lessen their appearance.

■Retinoid cream

Retinoid cream is a topical medication. The cream helps rebuild the collagen in your skin.

■Laser Therapy

The lasers can help stimulate collagen or elastin in your skin to grow. There are various types of laser therapy.

■Glycolic Acid

Glycolic acid creams and chemical peels work to help lessen the appearance of current stretch marks, but they do not keep new ones from forming.

Stretch marks often fade to become less noticeable with time.

Preventing them can be difficult but keeping your weight in check, staying hydrated, eating a healthy diet, and seeking treatment soon after the marks appear may help.

Pregnancy Education month

February’s Pregnancy Education Month campaign highlights how childbirth education empowers parents for a better birth experience.

Birth is the most natural process on earth and yet studies have shown that one in every four women describes giving birth as traumatic and up to 20% meet the criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder. It has also been shown that women who fear childbirth experience longer labours and were more likely to need an emergency caesarean.

‘There is a link between a lack of knowledge, fear and the experience of childbirth,’ says Lynne Bluff, national co-ordinator for the Childbirth Educators’ Professional Forum (CBEPF), which is partnering with Bio-Oil and hospitals nationally for the ‘Empowering Birth’ Pregnancy Education Monthcampaign.

Good childbirth classes, says Bluff, will equip parents with the pros and cons of all the available childbirth options as well as practical tips and techniques for the birth and afterwards. Childbirth educators are usually nurses and midwives and parents who can share both professional expertise and personal experience. Classes are offered at many hospitals, clinics and private practices.

‘We believe that when parents are informed, any type of birth, from homebirth to caesarean, can be an empowering one. It shifts from a potentially overwhelming experience to one that is fulfilling, positive and, ultimately, beneficial to mother and child,’ says Anna Guerin of Bio-Oil. ‘There is simply no substitute for evidence-based information provided by qualified and experienced professionals. With quality childbirth education, parents are empowered and properly prepared in a warm and supportive way,’ says Bluff.

Over 300 private hospitals and clinics around South Africa are running Pregnancy Education Month activities in February.

For details, or to find a childbirth educator in your area, visit www.PregnancyEducation.co.za.

Research and References

· Antenatal education appears to alleviate post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms after childbirth – The effects of antenatal education on fear of childbirth, maternal self-efficacy and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms following childbirth: an experimental study. Appl Nurs Res. 2016 Nov; 32:227-232. doi: 10.1016/j.apnr.2016.07.013. Epub 2016 Jul 30. Gökçe İsbir G1, İnci F2, Önal H3, Yıldız PD4. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27969033)

· Educational interventions may reduce fear of childbirth with double the effect of hypnosis; Interventions for reducing fear of childbirth: A systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials. Women and Birth, available online 7 November 2017, Vahideh Moghaddam Hosseinia Milad Nazarzadeh bShayesteh Jahanfarc, (https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1871519217302561)

· Women who fear childbirth experience longer labours ((Salvesen Adams, University of Oslo 2013, published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology)

· Improved maternal mental health (National Childbirth Trust, 2010)

· Decreased use of epidural anaesthesia during childbirth (Ferguson, Davis & Brown, 2013)

· Greater satisfaction for the parents and parent-infant relationships after birth (National Childbirth Trust, 2010)

· A blended mindfulness and skills-based childbirth education intervention is associated with improvements in women’s sense of control and confidence in giving birth – Effectiveness of a Mindfulness-Based Childbirth Education pilot study on maternal self-efficacy and fear of childbirth. Byrne, Hauck Y, Fisher C, Bayes S, Schutze R. J Midwifery Womens Health. 2014 Mar-Apr; 59(2):192-7. doi: 10.1111/jmwh.12075. Epub 2013 Dec 10. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24325752)

· Attending prenatal classes is one of the factors found to be favouring breastfeeding – Breastfeeding Determinants in Healthy Term Newborns, Colombo L1, Crippa BL2, Consonni D3, Bettinelli ME4, Agosti V5, Mangino G6, Bezze EN7, Mauri PA8, Zanotta L9, Roggero P10, Plevani L11, Bertoli D12, Giannì ML13, Mosca F14, Nutrients. 2018 Jan 5; 10(1). pii: E48. doi: 10.3390/nu10010048. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29304013)

· Increased breastfeeding initiation and continuation (Schrader-McMillan, Barlow & Redshaw, 2009)

· Women who fear childbirth experience longer labours ((Salvesen Adams, University of Oslo 2013, published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology)

· The World Health Organisation (http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/topics/maternal_perinatal/faq-cs-section/en/)