Game of Humanity cards

Last year we reviewed the Game of Humanity cards.

https://funmammasa.wordpress.com/2017/07/03/the-game-for-humanity-cards/

Thus brilliant set of cards were designed to spread positive gestures one card at a time.

The idea behind this concept is to pick a card, complete the random act of kindness and leave the card with the person you gifted /helped for them to pay it forward.

You can purchase your own set at http://www.gameforhumanity.com

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Tree of life App

Have you ever heard of a “brelfie”?

WHAT IS A “BRELFIE”?

A BRELFIE is a selfie chosen to make breastfeeding even more beautiful than what it already is.

How does it work ?

The app allows you to add a magical Tree of Life to their pictures, and the effect is nothing short of stunning.

You can either download pictures from the internet or use the app’s Tree of Life sticker pack.

You can also add other magical effects.

How to use the App

Moms have been sharing their BRELFIES on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter with the hashtags.

#TreeOfLife

#brelfie

Why share this ?

Moms are sharing not only to highlight the beauty of breastfeeding but also to reduce the outdated stigma of breastfeeding in public.

Bubiroo healing balm (review)

When I first spoke to Bubiroo about her awesome products, I mentioned little bears face rash.

He was teething and drooling. The fact that he sucks a dummy wasn’t helping much either on his #sensitive skin.

I had tried a few products and mostly just resigned myself to the fact that until those teeth were out the rash was here to stay.

This is the result of daily use for a week of the Bubiroo healing balm….

I apply a little each morning and again after bedtime .

The rash is completely gone !!!!

Thank you Bubiroo

For more information contact :

http://www.bubiroo.co.za

15 things to do that won’t cost you money

Here’s a list of 15 things you can do with your family this weekend that won’t cost you much money .

  • Visit the park – we have so many amazing parks on Cape Town. My favourite is the Greenpoint Biodiversity park. It even has an amazing fenced in play area for little kids.
  • Go sightseeing – I recommend a trip to the V&A, they have a free walking history tour. Just grab a map at the tourist information centre and follow the maps and signage.

  • Play a board game – when last did your family sit down to monopoly or scrabble? My boys are currently enjoying Risk.
  • Visit the library – go grab some new books and havd a chilled weekend relaxing with a good read.
  • Try a new recipe- the internet is full of devine recipes. Pick one to treat the family with.
  • Draw something- you don’t need to be an artist to draw. Try your hand at nature journaling. Take a book and some pencils outside and sketch what you see.
  • Camp out – if you have a tent put it up in the back yard . Build a bonfire and let the kids camp outside for the night. If you can’t camp build a table blanket fort and spend sometime in the fort reading to the kids.
  • Watch a movie – between DSTV, Netflex, YouTube and the internet your choices are unlimited . Or you could go old school and rent some dvds. Don’t forget the popcorn.
  • Learn a new skill – take the time to start that diy project you’ve been dreaming up or trying a new craft.
  • Budget- sit the family down and work out an entertainment budget for the month. Get the kids to make lists of things they would like to do as a family.
  • Make a time capsule- collect a box and everyone writes letter to their future self if puts in an item that is special to them. Agree to open in 2030.
  • Go through old photos – the kids will enjoy seeing younger photos of themselves and it’s always fun to relive a memory.
  • Exercise -take a walk,join a fun run or go for a bicycle ride.
  • Go geocatching – Navigating to find caches.Learn more on Geocaching.com: bit.ly/2sVBwOe

  • Make paper aeroplanes – teach the kids to make paper aeroplanes and race them.

6 foods to introduce into your diet for healthy eye sight

These six foods will promote healthy eyes and vision.

1. Carrots

Promote eye health and protect the vision. Beta-carotene helps the retina and other parts of the eye to function smoothly.

2. Kale and Spinach

Packed with Lutein and Zeaxhantin you only need 1 cup of these leafy greens to keep your eyes healthy.

3. Eggs

Eggs are full of Lutein which reduces the risk of age-related degeneration.

4. Fish

Fish contain fatty acids which helps with retinal function and visual development.

5. Oranges

Vitamin C isn’t just good for your body but also for your eyes. This vitamin also reduces the risk of macular degeneration.

6. Nuts

Seeds and nuts are full of Vitamin E which slows the progression of cataracts in your eyes.

Try to add these foods to your diet and take care of your eyes.

Pregnancy Education month

February’s Pregnancy Education Month campaign highlights how childbirth education empowers parents for a better birth experience.

Birth is the most natural process on earth and yet studies have shown that one in every four women describes giving birth as traumatic and up to 20% meet the criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder. It has also been shown that women who fear childbirth experience longer labours and were more likely to need an emergency caesarean.

‘There is a link between a lack of knowledge, fear and the experience of childbirth,’ says Lynne Bluff, national co-ordinator for the Childbirth Educators’ Professional Forum (CBEPF), which is partnering with Bio-Oil and hospitals nationally for the ‘Empowering Birth’ Pregnancy Education Monthcampaign.

Good childbirth classes, says Bluff, will equip parents with the pros and cons of all the available childbirth options as well as practical tips and techniques for the birth and afterwards. Childbirth educators are usually nurses and midwives and parents who can share both professional expertise and personal experience. Classes are offered at many hospitals, clinics and private practices.

‘We believe that when parents are informed, any type of birth, from homebirth to caesarean, can be an empowering one. It shifts from a potentially overwhelming experience to one that is fulfilling, positive and, ultimately, beneficial to mother and child,’ says Anna Guerin of Bio-Oil. ‘There is simply no substitute for evidence-based information provided by qualified and experienced professionals. With quality childbirth education, parents are empowered and properly prepared in a warm and supportive way,’ says Bluff.

Over 300 private hospitals and clinics around South Africa are running Pregnancy Education Month activities in February.

For details, or to find a childbirth educator in your area, visit www.PregnancyEducation.co.za.

Research and References

· Antenatal education appears to alleviate post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms after childbirth – The effects of antenatal education on fear of childbirth, maternal self-efficacy and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms following childbirth: an experimental study. Appl Nurs Res. 2016 Nov; 32:227-232. doi: 10.1016/j.apnr.2016.07.013. Epub 2016 Jul 30. Gökçe İsbir G1, İnci F2, Önal H3, Yıldız PD4. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27969033)

· Educational interventions may reduce fear of childbirth with double the effect of hypnosis; Interventions for reducing fear of childbirth: A systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials. Women and Birth, available online 7 November 2017, Vahideh Moghaddam Hosseinia Milad Nazarzadeh bShayesteh Jahanfarc, (https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1871519217302561)

· Women who fear childbirth experience longer labours ((Salvesen Adams, University of Oslo 2013, published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology)

· Improved maternal mental health (National Childbirth Trust, 2010)

· Decreased use of epidural anaesthesia during childbirth (Ferguson, Davis & Brown, 2013)

· Greater satisfaction for the parents and parent-infant relationships after birth (National Childbirth Trust, 2010)

· A blended mindfulness and skills-based childbirth education intervention is associated with improvements in women’s sense of control and confidence in giving birth – Effectiveness of a Mindfulness-Based Childbirth Education pilot study on maternal self-efficacy and fear of childbirth. Byrne, Hauck Y, Fisher C, Bayes S, Schutze R. J Midwifery Womens Health. 2014 Mar-Apr; 59(2):192-7. doi: 10.1111/jmwh.12075. Epub 2013 Dec 10. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24325752)

· Attending prenatal classes is one of the factors found to be favouring breastfeeding – Breastfeeding Determinants in Healthy Term Newborns, Colombo L1, Crippa BL2, Consonni D3, Bettinelli ME4, Agosti V5, Mangino G6, Bezze EN7, Mauri PA8, Zanotta L9, Roggero P10, Plevani L11, Bertoli D12, Giannì ML13, Mosca F14, Nutrients. 2018 Jan 5; 10(1). pii: E48. doi: 10.3390/nu10010048. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29304013)

· Increased breastfeeding initiation and continuation (Schrader-McMillan, Barlow & Redshaw, 2009)

· Women who fear childbirth experience longer labours ((Salvesen Adams, University of Oslo 2013, published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology)

· The World Health Organisation (http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/topics/maternal_perinatal/faq-cs-section/en/)